Webinář prof. Patricie Fumerton - Collectors, Consumers, and the Making of Seventeenth-Century English Ballad Publics: From Networks to Spheres

Srdečně zveme na webináře prof. Patricie Fumerton (University of California, ředitelka English Broadside Ballad Archive) o anglických kramářských písních. Každý webinář proběhne formou hodinové přednášky, po ní bude následovat půlhodinová diskuze. Patricia Fumerton patří k předním znalcům anglických kramářských písní. (https://english.ucsb.edupeople/fumerton-patricia)
 

Wednesday 14 October, 6 - 7.30 p.m. "Collectors, Consumers, and the Making of Seventeenth-Century English Ballad Publics: From Networks to Spheres" (this talk would cover how broadside ballads were collected, from the 16th through to the 19th century. It would then focus on the network of collectors of what I call the "heyday" of the broadside ballad of the 17th century, when the ballad was printed in swirling black-letter typeface, with many woodcut illustrations, and also a tune title. The center of this collecting network was Pepys, who had some connection, one way or another, with the other collectors of his time. I would also look at the ways broadside ballads were inserted into album books or pasted on sheets of cardboard, which often involved cutting them apart and rearranging the pieces. Finally, I would show how Pepys personally formed groups of people around ballads he would bring to parties, read, or sing.).

 

Webináře proběhnou v angličtině, na platformě Zoom. Zoom je třeba si předem stáhnout (https://zoom.us/download).
 

LINK NA VIDEOKONFERENCI:


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https://cesnet.zoom.us/j/91507022389?pwd=Q3NiNzNzNThjMXpOaUdhOVBRY0Q4dz09

Meeting ID: 915 0702 2389


Další webináře ze série:

 

 

Tuesday 27 October, 6 - 7.30 p.m.  "Resigning History: 'Greensleeves' Broadside Ballads from Late-Elizabethan to Restoration England" (this topic would focus on one of the most popular tunes of all times, still known today in English speaking countries, and it would track its morphing from a religious to a political tune during the turbulent times of the Restoration in the seventeenth century, the 1660s).

 

Wednesday 11 November, 6 - 7.30 p.m. "Tracking The Lady and the Blackamoor: Ballad Song, Image, and Publics, 1570-1789" (since Black Lives Matters is so prominent a movement even beyond the US, I thought this might be a very relevant paper; however, contrary, to expectations, and though I begin with a news article in an 18th century Gazette that tells the story of the ballad I discuss as if it just happened for real, I argue that the black servant in the ballad is fictional but speaks to many sorts of the populace that are not black but occupy similar positions, or positions that align with his in some ways).

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